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Cauliflower fried rice

I find myself often wondering and planning my meals for the next day, week and even sometimes, the following week. Even though I am usually only cooking for myself, I like to know what I am going to have for lunch and dinner ahead of time. Part of the reason is to keep my diet on track and the other part is just my annoying need to plan everything. While cleaning out the fridge the other day and asking myself the usual question of, “what’s for dinner tomorrow?”, I found a head of cauliflower that I never came around to using. While racking my brain for cauliflower dishes, I finally decided on making a healthy version of fried rice, without the rice! This dish also follows the theme for my blog this week, reinventing dishes to make healthier ones. Now I can enjoy my fried rice and still have a piece of chocolate after! 

cauliflower fried rice

cauliflower fried rice

cauliflower fried rice

Cauliflower fried rice
Serves 2
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Total Time
30 min
Total Time
30 min
396 calories
27 g
425 g
15 g
40 g
9 g
477 g
2306 g
11 g
0 g
5 g
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size
477g
Servings
2
Amount Per Serving
Calories 396
Calories from Fat 131
% Daily Value *
Total Fat 15g
23%
Saturated Fat 9g
45%
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 2g
Monounsaturated Fat 3g
Cholesterol 425mg
142%
Sodium 2306mg
96%
Total Carbohydrates 27g
9%
Dietary Fiber 7g
29%
Sugars 11g
Protein 40g
Vitamin A
118%
Vitamin C
149%
Calcium
21%
Iron
17%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
Ingredients
  1. 1/2 head cauliflower
  2. 1 tbsp coconut oil
  3. 1 cup onion, chopped
  4. 2 cloves garlic, minced
  5. 8 ounces shrimp, peeled, deveined
  6. 1 medium carrots, chopped
  7. 1/3 cup peas
  8. 2 tbsp tamari
  9. 1 tbsp coconut aminos
  10. 2 eggs, whisked
  11. salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Cut cauliflower into quarters. Grate cauliflower using grater or food processor until coarse.
  2. Heat wok or large saute pan over medium-high heat. Add 1 tbsp oil. When oil is hot, add onion and garlic. Cook until onion is softened, about 3 minutes, stirring frequently. Add the shrimp and cook for 1 minute.
  3. Add carrots and peas and cook for 1 minute. Add the grated cauliflower and season with tamari and coconut aminos, mixing until the ingredients are incorporated. Cook until the cauliflower has softened, about 3 minutes.
  4. Make a well in the center of the wok or pan. Pour the beaten eggs in the center and cook as if you would scramble eggs, stirring frequently. When the eggs are halfway cooked, stir together with the remaining ingredients. Season with salt and pepper. Serve.
Notes
  1. Tamari and coconut aminos can be substituted with soy sauce
beta
calories
396
fat
15g
protein
40g
carbs
27g
more
Cherry on my Sundae http://cherryonmysundae.com/

**Helpful tips and common mistakes

One of the benefits of having a client who is Paleo, gluten-free and allergic to almost everything out there, is that you learn to use vegetables in ways you would never think of. Cauliflower, to my discovery, is one of the most versatile vegetables that can be manipulated to substitute carbohydrates. I have prepared calzones, pizza crust, tortillas, and now, fried rice using cauliflower. By using the proper seasonings and adding other common ingredients found in fried rice, you can successfully replicate the dish without the grain (and you won’t miss it either!)

To make the cauliflower not only resemble rice in appearance, but also in taste, you want to grind it to a coarse texture. The best method of achieving this texture is by using a grater. It’s quick and gets the job done.

cauliflower fried rice

Now the method for cooking the cauliflower fried rice is similar as to how you would regular fried rice. Cook all of the other ingredients, followed by the cauliflower and than the egg. When cooking the egg, crack and whisk in the center of the hot pan. As the eggs begin to scramble, start to mix it with the other ingredients. This is an efficient way to incorporate the eggs with the fried rice without having large clumps of egg here and there.

cauliflower fried rice

When I talked about this dish with someone who may be the biggest fan of fried rice, he stared back at me with a very hesitant look. However, after one bite, he admitted that it wasn’t bad! Okay, so he didn’t say it was exactly like fried rice but I wasn’t expecting that. The cauliflower may be softer than rice but the flavors are very similar. This dish can easily be substituted with whatever ingredients you have such as beef, pork, chicken, mushrooms, green beans, and even pineapple for a sweeter twist. Healthy cauliflower fried rice here I come!

cauliflower fried rice

 

 

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Comments: 9

  1. Karen @ Baking In A Tornado 01/22/2014 at 5:57 pm Reply

    What an imaginative use of Cauliflower. I can’t wait to try this for my family. I bet the kids will eat it. Sharing this post!

    • cma0425 01/22/2014 at 10:49 am Reply

      Thank you! A great way to feed vegetables to kids!

  2. Betsy @ Desserts Required 01/24/2014 at 11:16 pm Reply

    I LOVE this dish! Fried rice means that I have to first have ‘cooked’ rice. This is perfect!!

    • cma0425 01/25/2014 at 2:14 am Reply

      Yup saves you a step!

  3. CTGirl74 01/26/2014 at 3:49 pm Reply

    I’m a weight loss surgery patient and I’m wondering if this recipe can be scaled down simply by halving the ingredients. My husband wouldn’t touch something like this (he’s a burger-and-dogs guy) so it would be only myself eating it and I can only eat about a quarter cup at a time. As an alternative, would it freeze well?

    • cma0425 01/26/2014 at 8:32 am Reply

      You can definitely scale down the recipe. I don’t think this would freeze very well; I feel like the flavors would diminish and the quality of the cauliflower would not uphold in the freezer.

      • CTGirl74 01/26/2014 at 4:45 pm Reply

        Thanks!

  4. Tina the Eater 02/15/2014 at 7:44 pm Reply

    What are coconut aminos?

    • cma0425 02/15/2014 at 11:45 pm Reply

      It’s a soy-free seasoning sauce that’s gluten-free and perfect for substituting soy sauce in Asian dishes for people on Paleo, gluten-free diets. If you have a hard time finding it, feel free to use tamari or soy sauce if you’re not a gluten-free diet

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